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Therapy Buka Syaraf Tingkatkan Efek Herbal

Selasa, 28 Oktober 2008

Mensinergikan therapy buka syaraf dan pengobatan herbal akan memberikan dampak kesembuhan yang sangat cepat dan signifikan terutama untuk penyakit-penyakit tertentu yang mudah terukur dengan alat tertentu misalnya tekanan darah tinggi, diabet mellitus.

Selain itu juga akan membantu mempercepat kesembuhan berbagai macam penyakit kronis seperti stroke, kanker dan lever serta kebutaan akibat diabet melitus serta gangguan syaraf.

Therapy buka syaraf adalah suatu metode pengobatan tradisional yang sudah dilakukan para nenek moyang kita dengan cara memijat atau mengurut bagian tubuh manusia. dengan membuka simpul syaraf di titik-titik tertentu terutama daerah kaki bagian bawah.

Therapy pijit buka syaraf berbeda dengan pijat refleksi kaki yang dilakukan didaerah telapak kaki dan permukaan telapak kaki. Setelah itu pasien diberikan obat herbal sesuai dengan keluhan yang diderita maka obat herbal akan lebih mudah terserap oleh tubuh.

Pijit buka syaraf diawali dengan membuka simpul syaraf dimulai dari belakang lutut melingkar ke depan lalu lurus mengikuti samping tulang kaki depan kemudian dilanjutkan ke seluruh permukaan kaki bagian depan hingga belakang.

Bila ada gangguan penyakit maka dibagian titik-titik tertentu akan teraba sumbatan yang berbentuk gumpalan atau benjolan di bawah permukaan kulit dan terasa lebih sakit. Gumpalan atau benjolan tersebut harus dihaluskan atau diratakan hingga tak teraba lagi sehingga simpul-simpul syaraf akan terbuka dan peredaran darah di seluruh tubuh akan mengalir lebih lancar. Setelah peredaran darah lancar dilanjutkan dengan pengobatan herbal sesuai dengan keluhan penyakitnya.

Keberhasilan therapy buka syaraf dengan pengobatan herbal dalam waktu 2 sampai dengan 3 hari langsung bisa terukur terutama untuk hipertensi dan diabet mellitus. Bahkan bila dilakukan oleh pengobat yang sudah sangat ahli, hasilnya langsung nampak seketika atau bisa terukur langsung setelah selesai therapy. Untuk membuktikannya

sebelum dilakukan therapy sebaiknya pasien diperiksa dulu kesehatan secara keseluruhan terutama tekanan darahnya dan kadar gula darahnya. Untuk mendapatkan hasil yang maksimal dianjurkan pasien mengkonsumsi obat herbal secara rutin setiap hari dan therapy buka syaraf dilakukan tiga hari sekali, minimal selama tiga kali berturut-turut menggunakan minyak herbal.

Sebelum dilakukan therapy sebaiknya dilakukan perendaman kaki dengan air hangat dicampur garam dan minyak herbal agar pori-pori mudah terbuka dan secara langsung obat herbal bisa terserap melalui pori-pori yang sudah membuka. Tentu saja harus diikuti dengan pola makan, pola hidup yang benar dan Olah Raga.

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A Brief of Health

Selasa, 08 Januari 2008

Everybody talks about e-health these days, but few people have come up with a clear definition of this comparatively new term.

Barely in use before 1999, this term now seems to serve as a general "buzzword," used to characterize not only "Internet medicine", but also virtually everything related to computers and medicine.

The term was apparently first used by industry leaders and marketing people rather than academics.

They created and used this term in line with other "e-words" such as e-commerce, e-business, e-solutions, and so on, in an attempt to convey the promises, principles, excitement (and hype) around e-commerce (electronic commerce) to the health arena, and to give an account of the new possibilities the Internet is opening up to the area of health care. Intel, for example, referred to e-health as "a concerted effort undertaken by leaders in health care and hi-tech industries to fully harness the benefits available through convergence of the Internet and health care." Because the Internet created new opportunities and challenges to the traditional health care information technology industry, the use of a new term to address these issues seemed appropriate.

These "new" challenges for the health care information technology industry were mainly (1) the capability of consumers to interact with their systems online (B2C = "business to consumer"); (2) improved possibilities for institution-to-institution transmissions of data (B2B = "business to business"); (3) new possibilities for peer-to-peer communication of consumers (C2C = "consumer to consumer").

So, how can we define e-health in the academic environment? One JMIR Editorial Board member feels that the term should remain in the realm of the business and marketing sector and should be avoided in scientific medical literature and discourse. However, the term has already entered the scientific literature (today, 76 Medline-indexed articles contain the term "e-health" in the title or abstract).

What remains to be done is - in good scholarly tradition - to define as well as possible what we are talking about. However, as another member of the Editorial Board noted, "stamping a definition on something like e-health is somewhat like stamping a definition on 'the Internet': It is defined how it is used - the definition cannot be pinned down, as it is a dynamic environment, constantly moving."

It seems quite clear that e-health encompasses more than a mere technological development.
I would define the term and concept as follows:
e-health is an emerging field in the intersection of medical informatics, public health and business, referring to health services and information delivered or enhanced through the Internet and related technologies. In a broader sense, the term characterizes not only a technical development, but also a state-of-mind, a way of thinking, an attitude, and a commitment for networked, global thinking, to improve health care locally, regionally, and worldwide by using information and communication technology.

This definition hopefully is broad enough to apply to a dynamic environment such as the Internet and at the same time acknowledges that e-health encompasses more than just "Internet and Medicine".

As such, the "e" in e-health does not only stand for "electronic," but implies a number of other "e's," which together perhaps best characterize what e-health is all about (or what it should be). Last, but not least, all of these have been (or will be) issues addressed in articles published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

Source: http://www.jmir.org/2001/2/e20/

Cancer

Detailed Guide: Breast Cancer
What Is Breast Cancer?
Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts from cells of the breast. A malignant tumor is a group of cancer cells that may invade surrounding tissues or spread (metastasize) to distant areas of the body. The disease occurs almost entirely in women, but men can get it, too. The remainder of this document refers only to breast cancer in women. For information on breast cancer in men, see the American Cancer Society's document, Breast Cancer in Men.

Normal Breast Structure
In order to understand breast cancer, it is helpful to have some basic knowledge about the normal structure of the breasts.

The female breast is made up mainly of lobules (milk-producing glands), ducts (tiny tubes that carry the milk from the lobules to the nipple), and stroma (fatty tissue and connective tissue surrounding the ducts and lobules, blood vessels, and lymphatic vessels).

Most breast cancers begin in the cells that line the ducts (ductal cancers); some begin in the cells that line the lobules (lobular cancers), and the rest in other tissues.

The Lymph (Lymphatic) System
The lymph system is important to understand because it is one of the ways in which breast cancers can spread. This system has several parts.

Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped collections of immune system cells that are connected by lymphatic vessels. Lymphatic vessels are like small veins, except that they carry a clear fluid called lymph (instead of blood) away from the breast. Lymph contains tissue fluid and waste products, as well as immune system cells (cells that are important in fighting infections). Breast cancer cells can enter lymphatic vessels and begin to grow in lymph nodes.

Most lymphatic vessels in the breast connect to lymph nodes under the arm (axillary nodes). Some lymphatic vessels connect to lymph nodes inside the chest (internal mammary nodes) and those either above or below the collarbone (supraclavicular or infraclavicular nodes).

Knowing if the cancer cells have spread to lymph nodes is important because if it has, there is a higher chance that the cells could have also gotten into the bloodstream and spread (metastasized) to other sites in the body. The more lymph nodes that are involved with the breast cancer, the more likely it is that the cancer may be found in other organs as well. This is important to know because it could affect your treatment plan. But not all women with lymph node involvement develop metastases, and it is not unusual for a woman to have negative lymph nodes and later develop metastases.

Benign Breast Lumps
Most breast lumps are not cancerous; that is, they are benign. Still, some need to be sampled and viewed under a microscope to prove they are not cancer.

Fibrocystic Changes
Most lumps turn out to be fibrocystic changes. The term "fibrocystic" refers to fibrosis and cysts. Fibrosis is the formation of fibrous (or scar-like) tissue, and cysts are fluid-filled sacs. Fibrocystic changes can cause breast swelling and pain. This often happens just before a period is about to begin. Your breasts may feel lumpy and, sometimes, you may notice a clear or slightly cloudy nipple discharge.

Other Benign Breast Lumps
Benign breast tumors such as fibroadenomas or intraductal papillomas are abnormal growths, but they are not cancer and cannot spread outside of the breast to other organs. They are not life threatening. Still, some benign breast conditions are important because women with these conditions have a higher risk of developing breast cancer.

For more information see the section, "What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer?" and the American Cancer Society document, Noncancerous Breast Conditions.

Breast Cancer General Terms
It is important to understand some of the key words used to describe breast cancer.

Carcinoma
This is a term used to describe a cancer that begins in the lining layer (epithelial cells) of organs such as the breast. Nearly all breast cancers are carcinomas (either ductal carcinomas or lobular carcinomas).

Adenocarcinoma
An adenocarcinoma is a type of carcinoma that starts in glandular tissue (tissue that makes and secretes a substance). The ducts and lobules of the breast are glandular tissue (they make breast milk), so cancers starting in these areas are sometimes called adenocarcinomas.

Carcinoma In Situ
This term is used for the early stage of cancer, when it is confined to the layer of cells where it began. Specifically in breast cancer, in situ means that the cancer cells remain confined to ducts (ductal carcinoma in situ) or lobules (lobular carcinoma in situ). They have not invaded into deeper tissues in the breast or spread to other organs in the body, and are sometimes referred to as non-invasive breast cancers.

Invasive (Infiltrating) Carcinoma
An invasive cancer is one that has already invaded beyond the layer of cells where it started (as opposed to carcinoma in situ). Most breast cancers are invasive carcinomas -- either invasive ductal carcinoma or invasive lobular carcinoma.

Sarcoma
Sarcomas are cancers that start from connective tissues such as fat tissue or blood vessels. Sarcomas of the breast are rare.

Types of Breast Cancers
There are several types of breast cancer, although some of them are quite rare. It is not unusual for a single breast tumor to be a combination of these types and to have a mixture of invasive and in situ cancer.

Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS)
Ductal carcinoma in situ (also known as intraductal carcinoma) is the most common type of non-invasive breast cancer. DCIS means that the cancer cells are inside the ducts but have not spread through the walls of the ducts into the surrounding breast tissue.

About 1 out of 5 new breast cancer cases will be DCIS. Nearly all women diagnosed at this early stage of breast cancer can be cured. A mammogram is often the best way to find DCIS early.

When DCIS is diagnosed, the pathologist (a doctor specializing in diagnosing disease from tissue samples) will look for an area of dead or dying cancer cells, called tumor necrosis, within the tissue sample. If necrosis is present, the tumor is likely to be more aggressive. The term comedocarcinoma is often used to describe DCIS with necrosis.


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Cancer: Jenis-Jenis Kanker

Senin, 07 Januari 2008

Detailed Guide: Breast Cancer
What Is Breast Cancer?

Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts from cells of the breast. A malignant tumor is a group of cancer cells that may invade surrounding tissues or spread (metastasize) to distant areas of the body. The disease occurs almost entirely in women, but men can get it, too.

The remainder of this document refers only to breast cancer in women. For information on breast cancer in men, see the American Cancer Society's document, Breast Cancer in Men.

Normal Breast Structure
In order to understand breast cancer, it is helpful to have some basic knowledge about the normal structure of the breasts.

The female breast is made up mainly of lobules (milk-producing glands), ducts (tiny tubes that carry the milk from the lobules to the nipple), and stroma (fatty tissue and connective tissue surrounding the ducts and lobules, blood vessels, and lymphatic vessels).

Most breast cancers begin in the cells that line the ducts (ductal cancers); some begin in the cells that line the lobules (lobular cancers), and the rest in other tissues.

The Lymph (Lymphatic) System
The lymph system is important to understand because it is one of the ways in which breast cancers can spread. This system has several parts.

Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped collections of immune system cells that are connected by lymphatic vessels. Lymphatic vessels are like small veins, except that they carry a clear fluid called lymph (instead of blood) away from the breast. Lymph contains tissue fluid and waste products, as well as immune system cells (cells that are important in fighting infections). Breast cancer cells can enter lymphatic vessels and begin to grow in lymph nodes.

Most lymphatic vessels in the breast connect to lymph nodes under the arm (axillary nodes). Some lymphatic vessels connect to lymph nodes inside the chest (internal mammary nodes) and those either above or below the collarbone (supraclavicular or infraclavicular nodes).

Knowing if the cancer cells have spread to lymph nodes is important because if it has, there is a higher chance that the cells could have also gotten into the bloodstream and spread (metastasized) to other sites in the body. The more lymph nodes that are involved with the breast cancer, the more likely it is that the cancer may be found in other organs as well. This is important to know because it could affect your treatment plan. But not all women with lymph node involvement develop metastases, and it is not unusual for a woman to have negative lymph nodes and later develop metastases.

Benign Breast Lumps
Most breast lumps are not cancerous; that is, they are benign. Still, some need to be sampled and viewed under a microscope to prove they are not cancer.

Fibrocystic Changes
Most lumps turn out to be fibrocystic changes. The term "fibrocystic" refers to fibrosis and cysts. Fibrosis is the formation of fibrous (or scar-like) tissue, and cysts are fluid-filled sacs. Fibrocystic changes can cause breast swelling and pain. This often happens just before a period is about to begin. Your breasts may feel lumpy and, sometimes, you may notice a clear or slightly cloudy nipple discharge.

Other Benign Breast Lumps
Benign breast tumors such as fibroadenomas or intraductal papillomas are abnormal growths, but they are not cancer and cannot spread outside of the breast to other organs. They are not life threatening. Still, some benign breast conditions are important because women with these conditions have a higher risk of developing breast cancer.

For more information see the section, "What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer?" and the American Cancer Society document, Noncancerous Breast Conditions.

Breast Cancer General Terms
It is important to understand some of the key words used to describe breast cancer.

Carcinoma
This is a term used to describe a cancer that begins in the lining layer (epithelial cells) of organs such as the breast. Nearly all breast cancers are carcinomas (either ductal carcinomas or lobular carcinomas).

Adenocarcinoma
An adenocarcinoma is a type of carcinoma that starts in glandular tissue (tissue that makes and secretes a substance). The ducts and lobules of the breast are glandular tissue (they make breast milk), so cancers starting in these areas are sometimes called adenocarcinomas.

Carcinoma In Situ
This term is used for the early stage of cancer, when it is confined to the layer of cells where it began. Specifically in breast cancer, in situ means that the cancer cells remain confined to ducts (ductal carcinoma in situ) or lobules (lobular carcinoma in situ). They have not invaded into deeper tissues in the breast or spread to other organs in the body, and are sometimes referred to as non-invasive breast cancers.

Invasive (Infiltrating) Carcinoma
An invasive cancer is one that has already invaded beyond the layer of cells where it started (as opposed to carcinoma in situ). Most breast cancers are invasive carcinomas -- either invasive ductal carcinoma or invasive lobular carcinoma.

Sarcoma
Sarcomas are cancers that start from connective tissues such as fat tissue or blood vessels. Sarcomas of the breast are rare.

Types of Breast Cancers
There are several types of breast cancer, although some of them are quite rare. It is not unusual for a single breast tumor to be a combination of these types and to have a mixture of invasive and in situ cancer.

Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS)
Ductal carcinoma in situ (also known as intraductal carcinoma) is the most common type of non-invasive breast cancer. DCIS means that the cancer cells are inside the ducts but have not spread through the walls of the ducts into the surrounding breast tissue.

About 1 out of 5 new breast cancer cases will be DCIS. Nearly all women diagnosed at this early stage of breast cancer can be cured. A mammogram is often the best way to find DCIS early.

When DCIS is diagnosed, the pathologist (a doctor specializing in diagnosing disease from tissue samples) will look for an area of dead or dying cancer cells, called tumor necrosis, within the tissue sample. If necrosis is present, the tumor is likely to be more aggressive. The term comedocarcinoma is often used to describe DCIS with necrosis.

Source: http://www.cancer.org

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Herb Medicine: Obatan Herbal

Minggu, 06 Januari 2008

These resources relate mainly to Western traditions of herbal medicine (also referred to as phytomedicine, herbal medicine or botanical medicine) that rely primarily on the use of single herbs. Other traditional systems of medicine, particularly Asian traditions, use many herbs in synergistic mixtures or blends.

Examples are Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ayurvedic, and Tibetan. They are not covered in the following listings. Note our Resource Guides on Ayurvedic, Tibetan medicine, and Traditional Systems of Medicine.

We are just beginning to understand the complexities of herbal medicine, with its multiplicity of active chemicals in a single herb, and the interaction of a mixture of herbs found in traditional therapies. Previously, scientific research relied on the drug development model, which focused on a single compound and mode of action.

In order to effectively research whether herbal medicine is effective or even safe, we need to detect all the active chemicals that exist in a medicinal plant, but also evaluate their effects on humans individually and together.

We need to know whether the production process changes the chemicals; whether these compounds interfere with each other or with other drugs; and if our current technology can accurately measure all of the potential chemicals that may play a part in the effectiveness of an "herbal drug".

Herbal growers, manufacturers, researchers, medical clinicians, funding agencies are all part of the panoply of actors involved in the making of safe and effective herbal medicine.

As demand for alternative medicine has grown, so have the harvesting and collection pressures for numerous ecologies that produce the medicinal plants of interest. The largest impact on the availability has been the loss of habitat worldwide.

In conjunction with loss of physical resources, many aboriginal societies who have maintained vast and important bodies of knowledge about the identification and use of medicinal plants are being lost as well. Both physical habitat and ancient knowledge, once lost, will be gone forever.

An educated public is the best hope for influencing governmental decisions that will have far reaching implications.

The resources are selected and categorized to help you with your own research or background reading so you can become an intelligent, educated consumer not only of herbal products but, equally importantly, of information.

Ultimately, together we will influence not only the quality of herbal medicine available to us in stores, but also whether we will maintain the diversity of plant life necessary to sustain a diversity of cultures and alternative methods for maintaining good health.

Source: http://www.amfoundation.org/herbinfo.htm


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Honey: Madu

Sabtu, 05 Januari 2008

Madu (Honey)
Honey is a sweet and viscous fluid produced by honey bees (and some other species of bee[citation needed]), and derived from the nectar of flowers.

According to the United States National Honey Board and various international food regulations, "honey stipulates a pure product that does not allow for the addition of any other substance...this includes, but is not limited to, water or other sweeteners".

This article refers exclusively to the honey produced by honey bees (the genus Apis); honey produced by other bees[citation needed] or other insects[citation needed] has very different properties.[1]

Honey is significantly sweeter than table sugar and has attractive chemical properties for baking.[2] Honey has a distinctive flavor which leads some people to prefer it over sugar and other sweeteners.

Most microorganisms do not grow in honey because of its low water activity of 0.6[3]. However, it is important to note that honey frequently contains dormant endospores of the bacteria Clostridium botulinum, which can be dangerous to infants as the endospores can transform into toxin-producing bacteria in the infant's immature intestinal tract, leading to illness and even death[4] (See "Precautions" below).

The study of pollens and spores in raw honey (melissopalynology) can determine floral sources of honey[5]. Because bees carry an electrostatic charge, and can attract other particles, the same techniques of melissopalynology can be used in area environmental studies of radioactive particles, dust, or particulate pollution[6][7].

A main effect of bees collecting nectar to make honey is pollination, which is crucial for flowering plants[8].
The beekeeper encourages overproduction of honey within the hive so that the excess can be taken without endangering the bees. When sources of foods for the bees are short the beekeeper may have to give the bees supplementary nutrition[9].

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey

Sarang Madu (Honey Comb)
Madu adalah cairan yang lengket dan manis yang dihasilkan oleh lebah dan serangga lainnya dari nektar bunga.

Madu lebih manis dari gula meja dan memiliki ciri-ciri kimia yang menarik untuk pemanggangan. Madu memiliki rasa yang berbeda yang membuat orang lebih menyukainya daripada gula dan pemanis lainnya.

sumber: http://id.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madu


Nektar atau sari bunga adalah cairan manis kaya dengan gula yang diproduksi bunga dari tumbuh-tumbuhan sewaktu mekar untuk menarik kedatangan hewan penyerbuk seperti serangga. Nektar dihasilkan kelenjar nektar yang biasanya terletak di dasar perhiasan bunga (perianthium), sehingga hewan penyerbuk mau tidak mau bersinggungan dengan kepala sari (anthera) dan pistil sewaktu mengambil nektar.

Nektar merupakan sumber makanan bagi lebah. Dalam budidaya pertanian, nektar sangat penting untuk menarik perhatian serangga penyerbuk.

Harum bunga dan warna daun mahkota merupakan isyarat bagi serangga akan tersedianya nektar. Daun mahkota yang terlihat berwarna tunggal menurut penglihatan mata manusia, sebenarnya mempunyai garis-garis yang berpusat ke bagian dasar bunga jika dipotret dengan film sensitif terhadap sinar ultraviolet. Garis-garis yang berpusat ke bagian dasar bunga dapat dilihat serangga dan merupakan isyarat lokasi nektar. Berbagai jenis tumbuhan juga memproduksi nektar yang menarik hewan penyerbuk lain seperti kelelawar dan burung. Sebaliknya, bunga dari tumbuhan yang tidak memerlukan hewan penyerbuk (polinasi abiotik) tidak menghasilkan nektar.

Nektar terdiri dari dua jenis, nektar floral dan nektar ekstra floral. Nektar floral dihasilkan kelenjar nektar, sedangkan nektar ekstra floral dihasilkan bagian tanaman selain bunga. Nektar ekstra floral dimaksudkan untuk menarik perhatian serangga seperti semut yang menghisap nektar sekaligus memangsa serangga perusak tanaman.[1]


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Royal Jelly

Jumat, 04 Januari 2008

Royal jelly is a honey bee secretion that is used in the nutrition of the larvae. It is secreted from the hypopharyngeal glands in the heads of young workers and used (amongst other substances) to feed all of the larvae in the colony, including those destined to become workers.

If a queen is needed, the hatchling will receive only royal jelly - and in large quantities - as its food source for the first four days of its growth, and this rapid, early feeding triggers the development of queen morphology, including the fully developed ovaries needed to lay eggs. 

Some commercial royal jelly suppliers disseminate misinformation such as "Only queen larvae and adult queens are fed royal jelly"; the fact remains that all larvae in a colony are fed royal jelly, and adult bees do not consume it at all.[1]

Royal jelly is produced by stimulating colonies with movable frame hives to produce queen bees. Royal jelly is collected from each individual queen cell when the larva is about four days old. It is collected from queen cells because these are the only cells in which large amounts are deposited; when royal jelly is fed to worker larvae, it is fed directly to them, and they consume it as it is produced, while the cells of queen larvae are "stocked" with royal jelly much faster than the larva can consume it. Therefore, only in queen cells is the harvest of royal jelly practical.

A well-managed hive during a season of 5-6 months can produce approximately 500g of royal jelly. Since the product is perishable, producers must have immediate access to proper cold storage (e.g., a household refrigerator or freezer) in which the royal jelly is stored until it is sold or conveyed to a collection centre.
This product is combined with honey, or beeswax for preservation, as it spoils easily.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_jelly


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